This Week, I Read Preston Smith: Red Rover, Red Lover

Image Credit: Duncan Kidd via Unsplash “You & I—precarious pronouns/that I will never tire of using,” the speaker says in Preston Smith’s chapbook, Red Rover, Red Lover. This book is packed with dreamy, enchanting love poems with the perfect dash of mythology. In the poem, “A God of Oracles and Light,” the speaker says: “I…

This Week, I Read Jason Crawford: Summertime Fine

Image Credit: Brooke Lark via Unsplash “I learned how to say my father’s name from his mother,” the speaker says in Jason Crawford’s new chapbook of poetry, Summertime Fine. “She held the R in the pit of her jaw like a neck bone BeRnard and if that don’t speak love into the frying pan, then…

This Week I Read Paul Robert Mullen: disintegration

Image credit: Brigitta Schneiter via Unsplash “as months shift/like blackbirds preparing broods in colour/you will see yourself in teardrops,” the speaker says in Paul Robert Mullen’s new chapbook, disintegration. disintegration is a dreamy, spellbinding collection of poems which are meditations on change and loss. In the poem, “after school,” the speaker says, “we laughed about…

This Week I Read Matthew Haigh: Death Magazine

Image Credit: Jonathan Ybema via Unsplash “I will say my skull is a gleamy sheet of metal. It’s pretty and sheer. Your body smells so good, like the air. I’m really into the good stuff all over your heart,” the speaker says in Matthew Haigh’s collection of poems, Death Magazine. The book is set up…

This Week I Read Kay Chronister: Thin Places

Image Credit: freestocks via Unsplash “Things happen in thin places that can’t happen anywhere else, but they are never safe from getting lost between clay and mist. They are always in-between,” the Widow Clary says in the title story of Kay Chronister’s collection of short stories, Thin Places. The collection does some really intriguing things…

This Week, I Read Kate Garrett: A View from the Phantasmagoria

Image credit: Larm Rmah “Let me live behind a reclaimed mask set with jewels/long-ago dropped from bracelets, rings – abandoned/settings gather dust like empty coffins,” the speaker says in Kate Garrett’s poetry collection, A View from the Phantasmagoria. A View from the Phantasmagoria can be read on two levels–on one, it’s a collection of supernatural…

This Week, I Read Memento: An Anthology of Contemporary Nigerian Poetry

Image credit: Namnso Ukpanah via Unsplash “I grieved for my country. But/my country never grieves for anyone./She puts the tails of Panthers and Hyenas in my hands;// she runs away when they turn to bite./My country ran away from the beasts/ she built. She the Ostrich, the goddess of sprint,” Bola Opaleke says in his…

This Week, I Read Erik Fuhrer: not human enough for the census

Image Credit: Paul Biñas via Unsplash “some bodies have always been haunted/their houses built on toxic remains/their bodies breathing in/the dust of industry’s buried bones,” the speaker says in Erik Fuhrer’s collection of apocalyptic ecopoetry, not human enough for the census. The poetry in this collection involves stunning wordplay and the absurd that is stylistically…

This Week, I Read Christina Thatcher: How to Carry Fire

Image Credit: Lís Clíodhna via Unsplash “Conjure every fire you have ever read about—/London’s gutting, Brisbane’s breadless/factory, Boston’s burning,” the speaker says in Christina Thatcher’s collection of poems, How to Carry Fire. The collection has several threads that run through it–Thatcher’s family history, poverty, addiction, and how to move on, how to heal from past…

This Week, I Read Paul Brookes: Stubborn Sod

Image Credit: Lís Clíodhna via Unsplash “Enter her grove barefoot,/no leather here,/no blood sacrifices/done.//Offer her honeyed milk,/not wine,” the speaker says in Paul Brookes’s collection of poems, Stubborn Sod. Stubborn Sod is the second installment in a trilogy of collections which surround Pagan cycle of year. Stubborn Sod begins in January, with the Pagan Sabbat…